Wrapping up Another Year for Take on Rules

A Season of Writing

A blogging tradition of many folks is summarizing the past year’s stats for their blog. A few years ago, I thought about doing that, and opted to instead create a dynamic page for each year. The result is my Posts by Year page and the individual years; for example here’s a link to Posts for 2022.

Well How Did I Get Here?

In , I’ll be wrapping up my twelfth year of blogging. As of 45% of my posts and 54% of my words are from the time since the onset of the Covid-19 📖 pandemic in the United States.

In , as part of my job going to remote only, I stopped commuting 2 hours per day. And due to a role change, I ended all of my day to day interactions with two toxic coworkers.

That freed up a considerable amount of time and emotional energy. I put that into improving my writing workflow; in particular learning Emacs 📖.

In , I changed employers to one that encouraged me to write and syndicate to their platform; Here’s a link to the posts I’ve syndicated to DEV.to. This meant that I could spend some of my work time writing about programming and software development careers and publish to that platform. In other words, I gained even more writing time in my day.

In , I again changed employers; with a focus on helping grow my team. Which means writing and knowledge sharing. Some of which I have repurposed into blog posts; which I continue to syndicate to DEV Community 📖.

Alongside those career changes, I shifted how I played Role Playing Games (RPGs 📖). I’d play with Discord and my text editor open, taking notes as we moved through our games. Those notes I could then quickly convert to Session Reports.

And as my personal threshold for online collaborative game play decreased, I shifted to Strider Mode 📖 play, in which I played RPGs in my Emacs instance; the game session was the blog post which was the game session.

I suppose I’ve taken to heart Sönke Ahrens’s admonition “do everything as if nothing counts other than writing.”

Writing is my job; be it writing software, playbooks, recommendations, meeting notes, issues, or documentation. Writing is my connection to others and myself.

Tables and Graphs

What would an end of year “summary” post be without a chart? I generated the Table 247: Number of Posts by Month (as of 2022-12-31) and it’s corresponding graph as of ; the table does not include this post.

Table 247: Number of Posts by Month (as of 2022-12-31)
MonthNumber of PostsNormalized
January8077
February6469
March4645
April8080
May5351
June7474
July7371
August7775
September6969
October6462
November5353
December9491
† The Normalized column represents counts normalized to a month with 30 days.

To further bolster my claim of loving winter, or at least writing more during winter, I have the following Table 248: Number of Posts by Season (as of <time datetime=\.

Table 248: Number of Posts by Season (as of )
SeasonNumber of Posts
Winter238
Spring179
Summer224
Fall186

Conclusion

I am thankful to have time and space to prioritize writing. This , I’ve started writing even more. Most of it doesn’t materialize as blog posts, but are instead my thinking through requirements or logic puzzles seeking a path forward in my work.

I struggle to think of “knowledge worker” decision that could’ve been better than adopting Emacs. It seems clumsy and sad for me to even consider splitting time between Visual Studio Code 📖 and something like Logseq 📖.