About takeonrules

I'm an avid face to face gamer (RPGs, Boardgames, and Card games), though I'm contemplating using hangouts for gaming. I work for the Univeristy of Notre Dame. Sometimes I blog about work more often I blog about games. I have three children, a step-daughter, and a loving & lovely wife.

Exploring Ruins of Ramat for Game Day

On Saturday, four players and I delved into the “Ruins of Ramat” by John Adams.

Each player started with four 0-level villagers, ready to rescue a little girl’s dog.

Each player established their mini-marching order. Then I wrote down each character’s slot in the marching order and their luck scores.

16 named characters with luck scores, and a tally of monster hit points on the bottom

Mini-marching order and character luck scores

Keeping in mind that we had 2.5 hours to play, I kept my foot on the throttle, moving them through rooms.

Spoilers ahead

Two villagers ill equiped face off against a charging skeleton

Ruins of Ramat Cover Page (art by Doug Kovacs)

Cautious approach to a hole in Rose Hill

  • The villagers assess that the hole dropped 10 feet to a mossy and slippery stairs that descends another 20 feet.
  • Footing is slippery. Some slide into a chamber and the waiting ambush of a spider.
  • The spider bites, poisons, and kills a villager, and the villagers in turn slay the spider.

There are three directions to take.

  • One path leads them through a large room into another bat and guano filled room.
  • Hundreds of bats scatter around, in the confusion, as everyone is swatting away bats from their face, Oxy brains Ank for the second death.
  • Two large bats attack but the villagers dispatch them without further harm.

They reach a dead end, double back to take another passage.

  • From here they explore a series of long-disused monastic cells. One cell radiating holiness is still preserved.
  • They continue to a room with murals of warriors of light. Here they encounter 5 skeletons.
  • A blood bath ensues as the villagers opt to charge into the room.
  • One player watches as the skeletons fell her remaining three characters; Another player hands her one of their characters to continue onward.
  • Two other players each lose a character.
  • The survivors dispatch the skeletons. The survivors distribute the skeleton’s weapons.

They find an armory that includes lots of ceremonial weapons and an untarnished bronze shield

  • A villager picks up the shield. The shield curses the villager bestowing a -1d to all attacks.

Onward into a ruined library

  • With a bit of exploration they find a secret door into a preserved library
  • There are a few scrolls, books, and maps preserved; One of the maps looks familiar to the player (not the character); It points to a spot in the mountains
  • They also find two iridescent purple vials
  • A character uncorks the vials, smells lavender and sunshine. He drinks half a draught. And permanently gains 2 HP. He downs the rest, gaining 2 more. His other character follows suite, gaining 2 HP.
  • Onward to the next room; a bed chamber with 6 bronze figurines.
  • The elves notice a secret passageway and proceed into a hidden hallway.

They find another secret door, opening it to reveal two more skeletons and a robed skeleton.

  • They roll initiative and start the fight
  • One character charges in, stepping on a brittle flagstone, and falls into a shallow pit, breaking his neck.
  • The robed skeleton launches a baleful purple beam at one of the characters, he succeeds in his will save, taking half damage and surviving at 1 HP.
  • In retaliation, a villagers throws a spear at the robed skeleton, shattering its skull and ending its menacing existence.
  • The villagers dispatch the remaining skeletons.
  • In this room they find gold armor, a white gold ring, bronze amulet, and a bronze convex disk set in the wall.
  • The villagers divy up the treasure.

A bit of exploration and experimentation and POOF! a bright light and they are in a new room

  • This new room has a bronze convex disk, two treasure chests, and a glowing spear (similar to the spear they have been seeing in the artwork)
  • The villagers test the chests and open them. One is full of gold pieces. The other an ivory cylander with an incomprehensible scroll inside.

The guild beggar grabs the spear and she sees a vision of herself, standing on the battlefield, humans, demons, and skeletons lie dead around her. In her right hand, the spear; Her left hand a bloody stump. A large demon approaches and says “Let us not fight. Together we can be so much more.” I ask the player what she does. She throws down the spear. And the vision fades. The spear drops from her hand.

Another character grabs the spear, and sees a similar vision. I ask what he does. He throws the spear into the maw of the demon. He feels a warmth and realizes his life has changed. He understands the scrolls he’s read. He asks to see the ivory scroll and knows that it can lift the curse. (I awarded the neutral character 1d3 points of luck for sticking with her alignment).

At this point, we are running close to the end. I guide them to the next room, and I ask if they want me to narrate the final fight the demon. The players think about it, and we agree to play it out. In two quick rounds of furious combat, the rubbery tentacled demon of darkness slays two more characters but is in turn killed by the Spear of Ramat.

We close the session, with each surviving character at 11 XP. I also say that in future sessions people can use these characters. I also awarded each character one point of Luck for defeating a demon and bringing a bit of knowledge of Ramat into the world.

Mini character sheets of the 10 dead characters

The character sheets of the dead

Dungeon Crawl Classics – A Deal is Made [Session #3]

The plan was to meet on Thursday for our third session. We would perhaps conclude “DCC #66.5 Doom of the Savage Kings” by Harley Stroh. The majority of spoilers start later on (and I’ll give you warning)

This week there were scheduling conflicts and illness. At the start of the session we had the Judge (me) and a player (Erich).

In the last session, Erich’s elf Quinlyn died. I also realized that I had not given him the opportunity to bond with a patron (they had a week), nor did he have an extra spell for his high intelligence. With everyone new to the game, I wanted to correct this.

We did a bit of retroactive play. Erich bonded with the King of Elfland, sacrificing an emerald for a +1, taking minor corruption for a +2, and spell burning for 2. Quinlyn gained infravision as his minor corruption. He also chose Woodland Stride as his spell.

A bearded wizard with crown and otherworldly eyes

“The King of Elfland” by Diesel Laforce. From Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG

From there, we played through his death. As Quinlyn’s body expired, the King of Elfland whisked him away to convalesce in Elfland (for a week), but at cost. Prior the session, I whipped up the following table of demands for the King of Elfland.

d10 What does the King of Elfland require of you
1 The hound must die, but you must capture its soul. He gives you a net made of individual blonde elf hair. As you slay the hound, cast the net over it. Then bring the net to the wooded grove.
2 He has seen the strands of your fate. He wants you to bond 1d3+1 to him by the next full moon.
3 The Devil’s Tithe is soon due. For the cost of restoring you, I need two human souls in payment.
4 There is a wife of a devil in this village. Bring her, alive, to the wooded grove.
5 Nearby, an emerald enchanter is leeching power from Elfland. You must stop him.
6 There is a wizard not of your world. He is still weakened from his recent captivity. He is traveling and exploring nearby. His patron is the foul Bobugbubilz. Dispatch the wizard.
7 The drinking horn was a gift to a long dead friend. I wish it returned to me, so I may honor his memory.
8 The standing stones near Hirot have bound the surrounding lands to Chaos. You must unbind them.
9,10 Roll 1d8 twice on the chart.

He rolled a 1; With soul net in hand, the King whisked Quinlyn back. No other players arrived, so we took a brief intermission and played Boggle with another game night attendee.

After 45 minutes of fun, and a serious drubbing, two other players arrived. Thomas from the prior week; who’s surviving character “Snips” was also captured.

They each rolled up 4 new 0th level characters for them, and we got started.

Spoilers ahead…

Dungeon Crawl Classics - Doom of Savage Kings by Harley Storh

Dungeon Crawl Classics – Doom of Savage Kings by Harley Storh

In the previous session, Iraco the Hunts Master and his goons captured the adventurers. In the confusion and dim light, they missed Ralph.

Seeing Iraco and the hunters heading out, the 8 characters waited and followed a bit later. They heard the calls of Lloré (“The sun sets. Come out.” a long pause “You promised! The sun sets, it’s time to free Morgan.”). They waited. They hear the Iraco’s ambush sprung (“Bind them and take the to Hirot.”) They wait several minutes and head to the mound.

There they see Quinlyn, the elf, tending to Ralph. Quinlyn attempts to heal Ralph through by casting Sleep. He fumbles, and demon claws grow from his fingers. Spellburning, Quinlyn regains and casts sleep; healing Ralph for 5 hit points. The villagers, tired of Iraco and the Jarls inaction want to help the heroes. They plan to sneak into Hirot to free their friends and get their gear.

At the palisade, Arrick strikes up a conversation with Naven (a night watchman).

  • Naven lowers a rope and the villagers climb up
  • At the top, Naven grouses about Iraco, and noting the elf, he’s about to say something
  • Quinlyn casts Charm Person, and Naven buddies right up
  • Naven informs the adventurers where Iraco is as well as where the captives are being held
  • They hatch a quick plan
    • On Quinlyn’s signal, Naven will create a diversion – yelling something about an elf and halfling over the wall.
    • They’ll free the captives and then get the weapons

Ralph, the halfling, sneaks through the dim streets of Hirot; The adventurers back several stone throws.

  • Ralph sees the building, two guards at one door, another door barricaded with one guard on watch.
  • He sneaks to the side window, peers in and sees his companions, beaten and bruised. Two guards are inside drowsing.
  • Ralph scampers back

Naven creates the distraction on the wall, the two guards in the house come out. They go to the wall. The other guard heads out in the opposite direction.

  • Arrick approaches and strikes up a conversation with Nori.
  • Quinlyn arrives and casts Charm Person; Nori and Quinlyn are best buddies!
  • Quinlyn casts Sleep on Nori (with the primary goal of healing the captives). Nori saves and Quinlyn heals the captives.
    • Iraco must’ve poisoned the thief and dwarf as they do not awake (I don’t have their character sheets so I leave them there, in a drugged state)
  • The distraction draws to a close with the guards returning

The adventurers beat a hasty retreat and work their way towards Iraco’s

  • As they approach the the south gates, they see light from the great hall on motte. In the doorway stands the Jarl, his Thegns, and Sylle Ru.
  • A quick decision, Ralph and the villagers will remain inside the palisade. Quinlyn, Eustic, Odin, Lloré, and “Snips” will head out to the standing stones.
  • But, they’d need a distraction.
  • Ralph scampers up a ladder, throws some oil onto the burning brazier, splashing it on the palisade! How about a little fire.
  • The Jarl and crew working their way from the motte into the bailey, let out a cry of fire!

We divvy up character sheets and split the action (so everyone has at least one character)

First, Ralph and the villagers:

  • They sneak to Iraco’s house, stumbling upon some men playing dice
  • As Ralph draws close, Iraco steps out of the door. Ralph dives into the shadows, avoiding detection from Iraco
  • Iraco, with scabbard, bow, and arrows heads to the village square
  • Arrick approaches Iraco and convincingly gives a partial truth; They captives have escaped and are fleeing
  • Iraco insists that Arrick talk to the Jarl
  • Ralph sneaks in, grabs the wolf spear, the deed, map, jewels, and longsword of the dwarf
  • Ralph then knocks over the small oil lamp and the house begins to smolderWe cut to the standing stones:
  • Morgan was on the altar straining against her bonds
  • Lloré and Morgan reunite and share a passionate kiss and embrace
  • They retreat to the tree line to observe

Back to the village:

  • Arrick heads to the Jarl and convinces him as well
  • As Iraco’s thatched roof ignites the other villagers and Ralph beat a retreat over the palisade

They unite at the tree line and set an ambush for the hound

  • There is hope that the wolf spear is in fact the real one
  • The butcher puts their side of beef on the altar hoping to buy a bit of time in their ambush

The hound, in its malignant evil approaches the altar, arrogant

  • The adventures ambush the hound.
    • Eustace fires a magic missile.
    • Quinlyn burns the hound with flaming hands (with Ralph burning another point of luck).
    • Three villagers charge, one of them hitting, as Odin follows to deliver the killing blow with the wolf spear.
    • Odin, declares a Might Deed to Trip the Hound of Hirot.
    • The roll…3 on the d3 and 20 on the d20. Odin pinned the hound, breaking it’s leg, as he delivered the killing blow.
  • Quinlyn takes the soul net and casts it over the hound. The blonde hair turns crimson as it works its magic.

We draw to a close, parts of Hirot burning.

Dungeon Crawl Classics – Going Beyond the Funnel

I ran my first non-funnel adventure for Dungeon Crawl Classics. I wrote up some adviceAt the beginning of this session, I didn’t spend much time setting expectations; We instead focused on leveling up characters.I should have drawn more attention to Mighty Deed of Arms.

(Our next session is March 16 at 6pm [Session Report])

Four people, with dice, pencils, and paper, gathered around a table ready to play Dungeon Crawl Classics.

Gathering around the table.

Preamble

Before the adventure I made two random encounter tables. One for Bitterweed Barrow and one for traveling outside of Bitterweed Barrow. I used the tables as a chance to think through what possible events were happening; I’ll try to remember to post these at a future date.

We had:

  • A 1st level halfling
  • Two 1st level dwarfs
  • A 1st level elf
  • A 1st level wizard
  • A 1st level thief

A group without a cleric; I was curious.

Bitterweed Barrow

A week had passed since the villagers delved into Nebin Pendlebrook’s Perilous Pantry. There were funerals, a search for a new constable, and bickering over the estate of Nebin Pendlebrook.

The adventurers each made a pact to not speak of the wealth encountered. Over the week, they found themselves spending more and more time in the local tavern; Talking of their adventures.

One late afternoon, gathered around a table at the pub, the drunken goat farmer told a tale of the birth of a two-headed goat. Before it expired, the goat said: “Beware, beware the Eyes of Green.”

A little speculation…were the emeralds the green eyes? What else could it be? Regardless, the characters wanted to leave Bitterweed Barrow. They would head to Hirot to see about the deed to the building, and perhaps find out more about the map.

En route to Hirot, they encountered what appeared to be a small roadside shrine. Five straight branches forming a five-sided pyramid. Inside a clay bowl with 5 silver pieces. The dwarf couldn’t help himself…he pilfered the shrine.

Spoiler Warning: If you want to play Doom of the Savage Kings please stop reading.

Dungeon Crawl Classics - Doom of Savage Kings by Harley Storh

Dungeon Crawl Classics – Doom of Savage Kings by Harley Storh

Arriving at Hirot

They drew close to Hirot late afternoon. Seeing a macabre standing stones, used for some ritual sacrifice. As they were inspecting, a mob of peasants andeight mounted warriors drove forward a bound woman. She was the sacrifice to appease the hound.

They learned of the lottery, in which every three days the village randomly choose who to sacrifice to the Hound of Hirot.

Not wanting to interfere too much in a volatile situation, the adventurers opted to head into Hirot. Passing through the gates of the wooden palisade, they saw the locked lottery box in the town square, the large manor house atop the hill, a temple to Justicia, and an inn with a wolf spear sign.

Seek a place for the night, they went to the Inn of Wolf Spear. They found Broegan “Bull” Haverson behind the bar, weeping. The patrons in the common room were sipping their drinks making an effort to ignore him.

Bull’s daughter, Morgan, had lost the lottery; She was tonight’s sacrifice. A bit of back and forth banter, and the adventurers learned from Bull that:

  • Villagers had killed the hound two or three times before (Nothan the Elder of the nightwatch); but the next day it came back. Each time its reprisals were bloody massacres.
  • To forever kill the hound, they would need to bind it then deliver the killing blow. Otherwise, it would come back the next night.

Lloré, the village bard, came in and informed everyone that the villagers had tied Morgan to the altar. Now the waiting for the howls. The adventurers talked with Lloré and learned:

  • An ancient warlord possessed a magical spear that could slay the hound and a magical shield that could turn away the beast’s attacks. Bards call him Ulfheonar and say his tomb lies to the north.

The adventurers were keen on helping Morgan, but wanted first to get the spear and shield. Lloré made a deal, they had 3 hours until sunset. He would take them to the tomb (a 30 minute trek), but at sunset they would make for the stone altar and free Morgan. They agreed, but first spent 30 of those minutes securing some armor (They reached an agreement and borrowed the armor).

At this point, a fourth player stumbled into our gaming lair. I asked if he wanted to join, and he said sure. So I grabbed a sheet of 4 premade characters, and said these were the villagers interested in helping the adventurers end the plague of the Hound of Hirot.

To the Tomb of the Ulfheonar

They arrived to find a sealed entrance. After a bit of exploring (another 10 minutes) they found an alternate entrance and began their tomb exploration. There was now 110 minutes until sunset. Lloré stayed outside and would call when the sun was setting.

They entered the snake shaped tomb through a collapsed section of the mound. The first room had a pile of rubble from the collapse. They lit torches and proceeded further into the tomb, proceeding out the room and down the hall.

At the T, the halfling and dwarf looked both left and right. To their right they saw a long hallway, extending into a large room. At the other end of the room they saw a large door. To the left (and towards the sealed entrance) they saw a hallway leading into a room that had a bowl shaped floor.

They chose right, towards the impressive door, and entered into the room.

The following read aloud text set a terrifying tone:

The floor is covered by what appears to be thousands of thin, translucent strips of vellum. To your horror, you realize the crackling dried strips are the discarded skins of an untold number of serpents!

The original builders had set door as part of the construction. The door was un-openable. As they left the room, the elves both noticed a small passageway above the doorway. The halfling was quick to volunteer to explore. As did the two elves. They crawled along the 2 foot by 2 foot carved tunnel. It turned right, ran for 40 feet then turned right again.

Halfway along their exploration, the elves again noticed something. Poking and prodding, as they found a passageway leading up, they also heard the growl of a creature.

Combat! A tight and nasty combat ensued with the desiccated corpse of a human. The elf’s mithral armor staving off the worst of the blows. And as the final spear thrust from the halfing dropped the corpse, a horrendous snake burst forth and began a second wave of combat. In the end, the ghoul snake slew the elf before the dwarf slew it (the halfling burned 4 additional luck points to move the dwarf’s miss to a hit and thus deliver the final blow).

The combat went six or so rounds, in part because of poor rolling (with 3 player characters and a 4th joining in the end). The tight confines worked against the adventurers. The elf had lost his burning hands, so continued to spell burn in attempts to slay his attacker.

A bit of exploration and there were two rooms:

  • A 15 by 15 room with a 25 foot pillar. Up 20 feet was a spear and shield.
  • Another room had a skeleton, with a spear on his lap, a drinking horn, and a silver wolf pelt.

The thief secured the spear and drinking horn, while the halfling haberdasher rolled up wolf pelt. The thief learned that the drinking horn had healing properties, and passed the horn to the halfling to heal up his vicious wounds.

In the other room, the adventurers gathered to determine what to do. The wizard opted to cast spider climb to ascend the column. Bedlam ensued as the roof began to collapse, injuring several, and burying the spear and shield in pile of rubble. Despondent and battered, they left to search the rest of the tomb.

The Ambush and Capture

As they were wrapping up their exploration, Lloré yelled into the tomb “The sun sets. Come out.” They paused to decide if they would ignore their promise and continue delving. “You promised! The sun sets, it’s time to free Morgan.” The party heeded his call, and climbed out of the tomb. And into an ambush…

Half a dozen archers, sent by the Jarl, were waiting. A quick battle ensued, and the ambuscade downed 5 or so of the adventurers (killing 2 of the remaining 3 0-level characters). There was a call for surrender, and the still conscious characters surrendered. The archers treated the wounds of the fallen and I drew the session to an end.

Observation

I sensed that this session left a bitter taste in people’s mouth. In part, I believe, because magic was somewhat erratic and combat was brutal. But I stand by this game; The system and adventures are challenging and require player skill. I hope, as players continue, that their skill grows and they learn from their less experienced decisions.

I’m enjoying running from a written adventure, providing a charged situation for the players to engage. I love the maps, the flavor text, and the random rumor table.

House Rules

The party doesn’t have a cleric. I allowed for DC 10 Luck check to bind wounds and stabilize (within the 1st round). I also won’t be applying the Stamina penalty for bleeding out.

Dungeon Crawl Classics Agenda and Advice

Dungeon Crawl Classics is inspired by the literature that inspired the original Dungeons & Dragons. DCC is an homage to the play style of 1974. It’s a game of fantastical adventure, players skill, and collaborative world building.

The Character is Dead, Long Live the Campaign

You will lose characters. Yet without the risk of losing characters, their accomplishments are hollow. If you find yourself without a character, roll up some new ones, and I’ll introduce them straight away; We are all here to play the game, not listen to others playing the game.

We are at the table to play to find out what happens. We will explore the wending paths of story set in a world unlike ours.

As a Judge, I will strive for consistency in adjudicating the game. I am playing the game to challenge the players (and characters); I want to see them succeed, but I also will strive to challenge them.

Principles

Taking a page from Dungeon World, my agenda for judging a DCC game is to:

  • Portray a fantastic world
  • Fill the characters’ lives with adventure
  • Play to find out what happens

Some Advice from a Novice DCC Judge

Low-level characters are fragile. Spend your resources on recruiting some hirelings. There’s strength in numbers. These hirelings will serve both as a buffer to the “main characters” and as a pool of potential replacements.

Magic is unpredictable. This is the greatest deviation from original D&D. Unlike D&D, you need to roll to cast your spell. If you have a poor roll, you’ll lose the spell without effect. The higher your roll, the greater the degree of success and potency of your spell.

Engage the world by asking questions. Test your assumptions about the situation; Ask questions and check with the Judge if this assumption holds true. Ask questions about what your characters are experiencing. When you do engage with the world, state your intentions and any precautions.

Additional Advice from other Sources

Some of the player’s advice from Matt Finch’s Old School Primer (a free PDF)

  1. View the entire area you’ve mapped out as the battleground; don’t plan on taking on monsters in a single room. They may try to outflank you by running down corridors. Establish rendezvous points where the party can fall back to a secure defensive position.
  2. Scout ahead, and try to avoid wandering monsters which don’t carry much treasure. You’re in the dungeon to find the treasure-rich lairs. Trying to kill every monster you meet will weaken the party before you find the rich monsters.
  3. Don’t assume you can defeat any monster you encounter.
  4. Keep some sort of map, even if it’s just a flow chart. If you get lost, you can end up in real trouble – especially in a dungeon where wandering monster rolls are made frequently.
  5. Ask lots of questions about what you see. Look up. Ask about unusual stonework. Test floors before stepping.
  6. Protect the magic-user. He’s your nuke.
  7. Hire some cannon fodder. Don’t let the cannon fodder start to view you as a weak source of treasure.
  8. Spears can usually reach past your first rank of fighters, so a phalanx of hirelings works well.
  9. Check in with the grizzled one-armed guy in the tavern before each foray; he may have suddenly remembered more details about the area.

Play Through of Nebin Pendlebrook’s Perilous Pantry

Last night I ran a 0-level DCC character funnel at Better World Books in Goshen. We played through Purple Sorcerer‘s Nebin Pendlebrook’s Perilous Pantry.

TL;DR: Compact, dangerous, and exciting adventure (minimal spoilers ahead). DCC continues to amaze and inspire.

Silohuette of rotund halfling holding a shovel

Cover art for Purple Sorcerer Game’s “Nebin Pendlebrook’s Perilous Pantry”

To make sure everything was clear I read the following:

We will be playing a Dungeon Crawl Classics character funnel. Each of you will have 4 fragile characters to start. The goal is to make it through the dungeon with at least one of them alive. In campaign play, the survivor(s) would be your character(s) in further adventures. It won’t be easy, and you should think of your characters as pawns. Don’t risk them all at once.

There were 5 players at the table. Each player rolled up 4 characters

  • Four of the five players each had an elven sage
  • There was a goat, a pony, a herding dog, a duck, and a hen
  • A handful of spears and swords ensured some nice combat power
  • One unlucky player had 8s or lower for his characters’ luck (Ouch!)
Six people around a circular table with dice and character sheets

The character funnel in progress

Procedures

I took the advice of other DCC judges; Instead of using a combat grid, I went with theater of the mind.

Each player arranged their characters in a mini-marching order. They formed a plus sign: the lead character, two in the middle, and one in the rear.

In combat, if an attack came from the front, I attacked the front character who had the lowest luck. Likewise for rear attacks. The adventure module provided further guidance to beat on the unlucky.

As characters died, they were piled in front of the Judge’s screen; The above photo was taken before we started into the pantry.

Highlights

  • The duck, hen, and their owners were the first casualties; The sickening feeding frenzy set the dangerous tone.
  • The four elven sages each tried to read a magic scroll, and failed.
    • One of the elven sages rolled a 1…so I had him roll and he got major corruption. Alas he died before his head turned into a goat.
    • The lowly potato farmer took a chance and rolled a natural 20. His eyes glowed with power and he gained some minor wizarding power.
  • Creatures in the dark surprised a lone explorer (failed Luck check). With a quick strike, the creatures murdered and dragged the dwarf into the darkness; the rope fell to the ground with a thump.
  • A clever use of rope, crowbar, and a burned luck point helped retrieve a bit of treasure and circumvent what they thought to be a trap.
  • An oh so glorious critical hit by the squire for 14 points of damage; Hooyah!
  • Clever teamwork created a hasty firebomb from an oil soaked suit. They lit the suit and flung with a shovel. That earned a luck point.
  • A halfling reunited with his great grandfather that had disappeared a century ago…alas the reunion was rather short.
  • Some of the characters fled to an unexplored room; I’d call that a bad idea (but it worked out).

Player Interaction not Skills

At one point one of the players asked “Can I make a spellcraft check?” This was a great moment, as I responded “What are you wanting to know?” He said “Well I want to know if there’s magic. But I guess the glowing runes…” The player had enough information and we moved on.

What I liked about this moment was that it unlearned a bit of the skill proficiency mindset of later D&D editions. Players and characters both engage with the system. Through a dialogue the player and Judge can establish what the character knows or the Judge can call for a check.

Observations

The whole session was 6:30pm to 10pm. In that time we made characters and had 10 “scenes” – 6 combat encounters and 4 puzzle/role-playing encounters.

  • People were rightly cautious; we weren’t five minutes in when 2 characters died.
  • One of the rooms had too many possibilities; 3 doors, a column of water, and 2 fountains. I felt this room was going to grind on in indecision.
  • Combats were fast and furious; I don’t believe anything went more than two rounds.
  • By necessity, characters become rather morbid and mercenary
    • “Slide us your possessions and we’ll help” as an emaciated hand passes a rag doll and a candle
  • Characters were stewarding their luck; they knew I was targeting the unlucky. Yet they spent a luck point or two to get what they wanted.
  • If you want characters to die; give them multiple opponents. Even 0-level chumps can end a single big-bad monster.
  • Purple Sorcerer Game’s modules contains great advice and flavor/read-aloud text. In some cases the prose for a given encounter was rather lengthy and hard to scan.
  • With minimal characters features (eg. skills, feats, etc.) the players engaged the fiction of the story

At points in the adventure that called for a Luck check. If you failed your Luck check you then needed to make a saving throw. For experienced players, that’s not a big deal, but this confused the group. We muddled through it. It also felt a little like double jeopardy. In the future, I recommend skipping the Luck check and call for each player to make the saving throw for their character with the lowest Luck score.

Running DCC at my Friendly Local Book and Game Store

Thursday night games at Better World Books in Goshen are growing in popularity. Starting at 4pm and going until 10pm, there are many games being played:

  • Board games
  • Dice masters
  • Magic drafts
  • Role-playing games

Last year, I ran the Dungeon Crawl Classic adventure Portal Under the Stars for a group of 4 players. On Thursday, March 2nd, I’m planning to run a different 0-level character funnel at Better World Books (see the Facebook event).

My eventual goal is to start up an every other week game going; Though perhaps not on Thursdays. Most Thursdays I have dinner with my daughters (and that takes precedence). Also, there are already three other tables of RPGs on Thursday nights:

  • A closed group 5th edition D&D game (5 or so players)
  • Pathfinder league play
  • A 5th edition D&D game (9 or so players)

Regardless, I’m looking forward to the antics of 0-level characters, hopelessly outclassed, struggling and eking out their survival.

Campaign, Rulings, Descriptions, and Questing

Favor Campaign over Characters

In most games, characters start fragile. A dead character should not end the campaign. Players are busy. An absent player should not scuttle the session.

Ensure that the game can handle drop-outs. Also, ensure it can handle drop-ins. Someone has intermittent availability. Work so the game would be fun for them as well as the regular players.

Let’s call this Martin’s Law. George R. R. Martin “Song of Fire and Ice” is a testimony to ensemble stories.

Favor Rulings over Rules

I don’t want to remember a wide variety of rules. I want a light framework to help me adjudicate in a consistent manner. I want to avoid time spent looking up rules, but instead want to keep moving in a consistent manner. I want the players to get back to the adventure/story.

I also want to make sure players have tools that they can use to counter the sting of some of my rulings; Either giving them a bonus, re-roll, advantage, or way of buying it off:

  • Fate Core has Fate points
  • Burning Wheel and Torchbearer have Artha
  • Dungeon Crawl Classics has Luck
  • D&D has Inspiration.
  • Eberron has Hero Points

Favor Description over Prescription

This is an extension of Rulings over Rules, but merits further discussion.

When presented with a problem, are do players limit their response to they have on their character sheet? Or do they start narrating how they respond and look to you for adjudication? Are the players engaging with the adventure or their character sheet?

For clever or amusing ideas, don’t require a role. They described how they were looking for traps and how they would disarm it. Give it to them. Broadcast that you will be rewarding player skill. This is a core tenant of avoiding the grind in Torchbearer, and what the OSR builds on.

Also, throw them some Inspiration, Luck points, Hero points, or Fate tokens. Given them currency to further engage in the story.

In a DCC funnel I ran, one of the characters had a pound of clay and fashioned a terra cotta helmet in hopes of blending in with a bunch of terra cotta warrior automatons. Instead of requiring a Personality roll, I said it worked. If I had to do it over again, I’d also have awarded +1 Luck to the character.

Mighty Deed Die vs. Feat Trees

The Warrior in Dungeon Crawl Classics has a Mighty Deed Die. The Might Deed Die replaces your static bonus to hit. At 1st level, you get a 1d3 Mighty Deed Die. (2nd level it becomes d4, 3rd a d5, etc).

When you attack, you declare your Mighty Deed – trip the monster, blind it, dive between it’s legs slash its underside etc. You then roll your attack add your Mighty Deed roll and your strength (or dexterity) bonus. If you hit the armor class and get a 3 or higher on your Mighty Deed die, your deed happens. The rules suggest the Referee to scale the degree of success based on the Mighty Deed result.

The Mighty Deed Die subsumes 3E and Pathfinder combat maneuvers: trip, disarm, sunder, improved grapple, etc. It guides play from the character sheet back to the table and story.

Favor Questing over Railroading

Put decisions on where to go adventuring into the players’ hands. Let them know if they want it, they can quest for it. Lost a limb? Give them clues about the promises of the Regenerating Muds of Lazul. Ask the players what their characters want. Let them pursue those desires by engaging in the world. But make sure the world is not remaining static.

Set larger events in motion. Create rumor tables. Think off screen. In other words, favor a sandbox world over adventure paths. The campaign is more than the actions of the characters.

Postscript

I recommend three resources: