FLGS Quick Start

I’m on vacation, so I decided to learn a bit of LaTeX and consolidate the quick start rules I’ve been working on into a more print friendly format. Behold the fruits of my labor!

First page of FLGS Quick Start

Download FLGS Quick Start Rules

Free FLGS Quick Start rules!

LaTeX sources referenced and used:

Skeleton of Referee Section for Basic Fantasy RPG

Building on the previous post regarding skeleton rules for RPG, here is additional details.

BEGIN OPEN GAME CONTENT

Additional Equipment

Armor

Armor City Rural Base AC
Leather, Armor 25 sp 50 sp 12
Chain, Armor 100 sp 14
Plate, Armror 1000 sp 16
Helmet 25 sp 50 sp special
Shield 10 sp 25 sp +1

Weapons

Melee Weapons City Rural Notes
Light 10 sp 10 sp
Improvised -1 damage
Medium 20 sp 50 sp
Two-Handed 50 sp
Missile Weapons City Rural Range Notes
Bow 25 sp 25 sp 50/300/450
Crossbow 30 sp 50/200/600
Improvised 10/20/30 -1 damage
Ammunition (20) 5 sp 5 sp

Note: Medium Range -2 to hit; Long Range -4 to hit

Encounters

  1. Establish Encounter Distance (2d6x10 ft) (if applicable)
  2. Check Surprise (2 in 6) (if applicable)
  3. Check Reaction (2d6)
  4. Check for Random Encounter (1 in 6, appears in 1d6 rounds)
  5. Check Morale (2d6)
  6. Declare Intent
    1. Players may declare (+1 to initiative)
    2. Referee declares
    3. Remaining players declare (-1 to initiative)
  7. Roll Initiative (1d6 for each side in the conflict)
  8. Resolve Actions
    1. Magic
    2. Missile
    3. Move
    4. Melee
  9. If a pending random encounter arrives, go to step 4. Otherwise, go to step 5.

Check Reaction

2d6 The encountered creatures are…
2 Hostile
3-5 Unfavorable
6-8 Indifferent
9-11 Favorable / Talkative
12 Helpful

If you have a chance to parlay, you may add your Charisma modifier.

Check Morale

Player characters need never make morale checks. For all other intelligent creatures (including retainers and hirelings), morale checks are made if any of the following occurred in the round:

  • Opposition is first encountered
  • Half of the allies are incapacitated
  • Leader is incapacitated
  • Exposed to powerful fear affects (e.g. dragon fear)

Hirelings

Offering

Add your Charisma modifier to the roll.

3d6 Result
3-4 Refuse with Malice
5-8 Refuse
9-12 Uncertain
13-16 Accepts offer
17-18 Enthusiastic (loyalty roll +3)

Initial Loyalty

Add your Charisma modifier to the roll

3d6 Morale Modifier
3 2
4 3
5 4
6 5
7-8 6
9-12 7
13-14 8
15 9
16 10
17 11
18 12

Over the course of play, a retainers morale score may increase or decrease based on treatment.

Checking Morale

Roll 2d6 and compare to loyalty of the retainer; If it is higher, then the retainer leaves.

When to roll:

  • Returning from perilous environs to relative safety of civilization
  • Exposure to a perilous situation
  • When the hiring character is incapacitated
  • When orders are given from the non-hiring character
END OPEN GAME CONTENT

Skeleton of Basic Fantasy Role-Playing Game

I’m preparing to run an RPG at my Friendly Local Game Store – Better World Books of Goshen. I’ve been vacillating between Sword & Wizardry (Complete, or White Box), Labyrinth Lord, Lamentations of the Flame Princess, and the Heroes Journey.

Instead of picking one, I opted to create just what will be needed for that first session. This is by no means a complete game, but provides much of the player facing information to proceed. It is something I can print out and put in front of the players.

For more details concerning Old School Gaming, go grab Matt Finch’s free Quick Primer for Old School Games (PDF). See the following post for further Referee details.

BEGIN OPEN GAME CONTENT

Ability Scores

Ability Score Modifier
3-4 -2
5-7 -1
8-13 0
14-15 +1
17-18 +2

Modifier

  • Strength: to hit and damage in melee; feats of strength
  • Intelligence: to save vs. spell; For wizards, subtract from saving throws of spells you cast
  • Wisdom: to save vs. non-spells
  • Constitution: adjusts all HD rolls
  • Dexterity: to hit in missile; to AC
  • Charisma: to hiring; to loyalty; to parlay

Classes

Level 1

Features Cleric Dwarf Fighter Thief Wizard
Armor any any any leather none
Backstab +4/x2
Base to Hit Bonus +0 +0 +0 +0 +0
Base MV 12 9 12 12 12
Cleave No No Yes No No
Climbing 1 in 6 1 in 6 1 in 6 5 in 6 1 in 6
Detect secret doors 1 in 6 4 in 6 1 in 6 2 in 6 1 in 6
Hit Dice (HD) 1 (1d6) 1+2 (1d6+2) 1+1 (1d6+1) 1 (1d6) 1 (1d6)
Listen 1 in 6 2 in 6 1 in 6 3 in 6 1 in 6
Read Unknown Languages no no no 4 in 6 3 in 6
Saving Throw 14 13 15 15 15
Saving Throw Bonus +2 vs. death/poison +2 vs. poison/spells +2 vs. death/poison +2 vs. traps +2 vs. spells
Shield any any any none none
Spells 1 1st
Thievery 1 in 6
Turn Undead Yes No No No No
Weapon Damage, Medium 1d6 1d6 1d6 1d6 2W6
Weapon Damage, Light 2W6 1d6 1d6 1d6 2W6
Weapon Damage, Ranged 2W6 1d6 1d6 1d6 2W6
Weapon Damage, Two-Handed 1d6 2B6 2B6 1d6 1d6
XP to level 2 1500 2250 2000 1250 2500

Dice Notation

  • 1d6 – Roll 1 six-sided die
  • 2W6 – Roll 2 six-sided die, keep worse result
  • 2B6 – Roll 2 six-sided die, keep better result

Class Features

Wizard Spells

Charm Person Range: 30 ft, Duration: until dispelled, Save: negates, Affects: 1 living humanoid of human-size or smaller ; Caster is treated as trusted friend.

Detect Magic Range: 60 ft, Duration: 30 minutes; Caster senses location of magic within range

Hold Portal Range: 30 ft, Duration: 1 hour; Magically holds a door or gate for the duration.

Light Range: 60 ft, Duration: 1 hour; Target produces light as a torch (30 ft radius)

Magic Missile Range: 150 ft; A magic dart hits the target for 1d6 points of damage, no save.

Sleep Range: 240 ft, Affects: 2d6+3 HD of creatures, Duration: Referee’s discretion; Affected creatures enter an enchanted slumber

Turn Undead

Brandish your holy symbol and roll 3d6. Consult the following table. If the roll is successful, those creatures within 60 ft are turned – fleeing or cowering for 3d6 combat rounds.

HD Example 3d6
1 Skeleton 10+
2 Zombie 13+
3 Wight 15+
4 Wraith 17+

Equipment

Starting Equipment

You get both your class specific gear and an adventuring pack of your choice.

Class Specific Gear

Cleric: Mace with Chain Armor and Shield (AC 15)

Dwarf: One-handed weapon, crossbow, chain armor, and shield (AC 15) orTwo-handed weapon, crossbow, chain armor (AC 14)

Fighter: One-handed weapon, bow, chain armor, and shield (AC 15) orTwo-handed weapon, bow, chain armor (AC 14)

Thief: One-handed weapon, leather armor (AC 12)

Wizard: Spellbook (choose 1 spell, one at random), staff

Adventure Packs

Choose one of the following:

Pack 1: Backpack, bedroll, flint & steel, 6 torches (burn 1 hour, 30 ft radius light), 50 ft rope, crowbar, 7 days rations, and a water skin

Pack 2: Backpack, bedroll, flint & steel, hooded lantern with 2 pints lantern oil (burn 4 hours, 30 ft radius light), hammer, 12 iron spikes, 10 ft pole, 7 days rations, and a water skin

Pack 3: Backpack, bedroll, flint & steel, 6 torches (burn 1 hour, 30 ft radius light), a torchbearer (HP 2, AC 10, Move 12, Attack none, Carry torch, Loyalty 7+Charisma modifier), 7 days rations, and a water skin

Movement and Encumbrance

Encumbrance Modifier
Chain mail or greater -3 MV
Each 25 + (Strengh modifier x 10) pounds of treasure -3 MV
Excessive amounts of gear (Referee’s discretion) -3 MV

Note: Coins, gems, and jewelry each weigh 0.1 pounds. Note: Dwarves ignore the first two penalties to movement.

Description Speed Results
Sneaking MV x 10′ per turn As walking but able to move with stealth.
Walking MV x 20′ per turn Mapping and careful observation of the surroundings are possible.
Running MV x 40′ per turn No mapping permitted. Characters are automatically surprised and have no chance to surprise others. The sound of running may attract the attention of enemies.
Combat MV / 3 x 10′ per round Dashing around, battling foes, or fleeing.

Exploration

I encourage players to draw a map of the dungeon as it is explored (graph paper will be provided). Some things may only be discovered by reviewing the map.

Each turn of exploration (10 minutes), each character may:

  • Search a 10’x10′ area
  • Bind another character’s wounds (only in the turn after a combat); restoring 1d6-3 HP
  • Disable a trap
  • Move
  • Resolve an encounter

Every 3 turns, there is a 1 in 6 chance of a random encounter. Every 6th turn, the characters must rest.

Death and Recovery

When a character is reduced to below 0 HP, they must make a saving throw vs. death. Success means they are incapacitated, though any further damage they are killed outright. Failure means they are dead.

Characters recover 1 HP per day; 2 HP per day of bed rest.

Experience

While the current state of the rules does not deal with character advancement, it is something that bears discussion.

For each silver piece of treasure spent in town, the character gains 1 XP. Characters also gain XP for defeating monsters. However, the distribution of treasure XP to monster XP is about 4 to 1.

In other words, the vast majority of XP comes from treasure; plan accordingly.

Unlike many other systems, this uses the silver standard.

Checking Hireling Loyalty and Morale

Roll 2d6 and compare to loyalty of the retainer; If it is higher, then the retainer leaves.

When to roll:

  • Returning from perilous environs to relative safety of civilization
  • Exposure to a perilous situation
  • When the hiring character is incapacitated
  • When orders are given from the non-hiring character
END OPEN GAME CONTENT

It’s Only a Model

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python and the Holy Grail - The Arrival at Camelot

In my day job, I’m regularly modeling systems.  Typically the models involve relatively concrete concepts: a page, a navigation structure, a financial transaction (previous job), or a place on a map.  These models can be defined with a noun: Page, Navigation, Payment, Placemark.  The models themselves have methods, or verbs.  (i.e. render, publish, and pay).  Loosely, this is part of the definition of object-oriented programming.

Recently, I’ve had the urge to work on table top game-design (and no I’m not quitting my day job).  One of the things that surprised my wife is that I haven’t done any game-design.  After all, I am a poor soul hopelessly consumed by gaming.  

In large part this inspiration has come from reading D. Vincent Baker‘s Dogs in the Vineyard and Apocalypse World, Ryan Macklin’s most excellent (and mouthy) blog, Fred Hick’s very transparent blog concerning gaming, Gnome Stew’s blog (in particular about improv), Luke Crane’s Burning Wheel and Adventure Burner, Graham Walmsley‘s Play Unsafe, Bully Pulpet Game’s Fiasco, Brad J. Murray and crewsDiaspora, Evil Hat‘s Dresden Files and Spirit of the CenturyGrognardia, the Alexandrian, Daniel Solis; listening to Fear the Boot and the Walking Eye; and countless other influences.  In fact my Google Reader is loaded with all kinds of game related blogs.  My @takeonrules account follows several game designers.

But most importantly, the tipping point came from two sources on the same day: Mike Roe, my coworker and an all around creative spirit, who spoke on creativity; And my wife suggesting that I design, as a Christmas present, a game for our children.  I don’t know if I’ll get to that, but that is my present goal.

The problem is…What kind of game do I want to design?  My personality is one that enjoys refactoring and tinkering with other people’s work.  Getting started on a new project is very daunting as is pushing it through to the finish (I’m great in the middle innings).

I did a little bit of research, and ultimately settled on Game Design Concept‘s blog, in particular the entry concerning a game design syllabus and schedule.  I went out and bought, from my friendly local bookstoreScott McLoud’s “Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art”, Raph Koster’s “A Theory of Fun for Game Design”, and Brenda Brathwaite and Ian Schreiber’s “Challenges for Game Designers”. I’m working my way through the most excellent recommended reading, and will then begin in earnest working through the syllabus.

Clearly the game will need a theme and the underlying system should model that theme.  However, my training for modeling has thus far been focused on more concrete objects (i.e. Page, Navigation, Train, Shoe, Radio).  Modeling a theme requires modeling something much more abstract (i.e. Scarcity, Hope, Depravity, Corruption, etc.) than my standard fare.  So how do I go about doing that? (This is not rhetorical, but may come off as such)

From my reading, it sounds like Apocalypse World does an excellent job at modeling scarcity. Clearly depravity and corruption are not something I want to model with the kids.  So I’m going to be thinking about Hope, but I’m sure there may be other themes I want to explore.

What are Hope’s associated verbs? What other models interact with Hope?   That is the exercise left for the writer.

As a side note, I don’t think I’ll be working towards Daniel Solis’ Thousand-Year Game Design Challenge:

Create a game. The game can be of any theme or genre you desire, but there is one restriction: You’re creating a “new classic,” like Chess, Tag or card games. So, create a game to be enjoyed by generations of players for a thousand years.

That is a little too lofty of a goal for my first game design.